We have made a small but significant change to the roof windows in the guest-suite above the garage and to the upstairs section of the cottage.

Originally we had planned to have only opening skylights in the guest suite and while there were downstairs windows in the cottage, there were also only skylights in the upstairs section.

Original plan showing Velux skylights in guest suite.  The cottage has similar skylights on the northern roof face.

Original plan showing Velux skylights in guest suite. The cottage has similar skylights on the northern roof face.

Now that we are able to climb up to the upstairs level of the house, we are able to appreciate the outlook; not only to the north, over the park, but also to the west, over rooftops to trees beyond.  We realised that to be able to actually see out of the skylights in the guest suite, you would have to stand up against them and you would not be able to see anything but sky from a sitting or lying position.   We are now replacing the four west-facing skylights with two dormer windows and are adding a dormer window to the west face of the cottage roof.  The plan now looks like the one below and we prefer it.

Revised plan showing two dormer windows above the garage and one facing west in the cottage roof.

Revised plan showing two dormer windows above the garage and one facing west in the cottage roof.

 

This elevation gives a good idea of what the house will look like when approaching from the driveway.  Bernard, our architect, specifically wanted different roof heights which he feels are reminiscent of clusters of farm buildings.  This is the main reason why we have the flat-roofed link between the garage and main house.  That ‘link’ is to be the laundry.  I have always had an aversion to flat roofs because I have never known one that doesn’t eventually leak so this has been something of a compromise for me.  I do, however, appreciate his reasoning and I like the way it looks.  But I think I will climb up onto that roof myself when the waterproofing is done.

Looking carefully at this drawing has also revealed a strange-looking upstairs window which is supposed to be a conventional sash.  I’ll have to take that up at the next site meeting.  I have no idea how it has come to be drawn like this.  It is a west-facing sash window in the third bedroom.

The only other physical changes we’ve made so far have been the moving of the door leading from the kitchen to the scullery by a few centimetres and extending one internal kitchen wall by approximately 800mm.  I’m not sure but I think this is pretty good going.